THE ABSOLUTE NECESSITY OF THE PROTESTANT REFORMATION
By Pastor Peter Simpson, paperback, 92 pages


What do you think of, when you hear the word ‘Protestantism?’ Many respond in only negative ways upon the use of this expression. Such a misunderstanding, however, of its true meaning needs to be corrected. Protestanism is a good and positive word. It is a theological term and concept, not a reference to political and tribal identity.  


A Protestant is one who bears witness to the Lord Jesus Christ, and who publicly testifies to the message of His death and resurrection according to the Scriptures. In other words, Protestantism is Bible-believing Christianity.


The Protestant Reformation needs to be understood for what it really was - a mighty movement of the Spirit of God and a rediscovery of the true message of the Christian gospel, a message which God has revealed in His word, the Bible, with no reliance on the traditions and philosophies of men, nor on the decrees of fallible churches. 


Pastor Simpson's 92 page paperback sets out why the churches in every generation must stand on God's perfect revelation in Scripture, rather than on the changing ideas of men and church synods and councils. He examines the role of the Lollards in preparing the ground for the English Reformation, and focuses upon the vital parts played by Wycliffe and Tyndale in establishing the work of reformation and a return to an acceptance of the Bible's sole authority. The book further explains how Henry VIII was most definitely not the instigator of the spiritual reforms which the 16th century Church so desperately needed.  There is also a detailed examination - in a gracious spirit - of the grave errors of Roman Catholicism today. 


Pastor Peter Simpson specialised in the Reformation when studying history at London University, and has been the Minister of Penn Free Methodist Church in Buckinghamshire since 1990. All proceeds after cost to the work of the Christian witness at Penn. 


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